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Vetsulin Insulin 10ml

Item# IWM025454
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$59.40$64.99
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Recurring Saings in EprxAUTOSHIP & SAVE[Details]
Recurring Saings in EprxAUTOSHIP & SAVE[Details]
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Notices

Must be shipped Express 1-2 days. Shipping fees start at $29.95 and are charged for all orders. Someone should be present to sign for and receive the order when it ships to you. For more shipping info click here.

Description

Vetsulin (porcine insulin zinc suspension) is the first and only FDA-approved insulin available in the U.S. for treating diabetic dogs and cats. Vetsulin controls levels of glucose in the blood to help alleviate diabetic symptoms. Vetsulin Insulin is available as a 10 ml vial that is used with U-40 insulin syringes (sold separately). Vetsulin requires a prescription from your veterinarian. Vetsulin Insulin requires refrigeration and must be kept at refrigerator temperatures at all times.

Key Benefits

  • Controls your pet's glucose levels and alleviates symptoms of diabetes.
  • Improvement can usually be seen within a few days.
  • First and only FDA-approved pet insulin available in the U.S.

How It Works

Insulin is a hormone that is naturally produced by the pancreas. When the body does not produce enough insulin, or when the insulin produced is not effective, it results in diabetes mellitus. Vetsulin is an aqueous suspension of porcine (pork) insulin that controls hyperglycemia in pets with diabetes.

Indications

Vetsulin (porcine insulin zinc suspension) is indicated for the reduction of hyperglycemia and hyperglycemia-associated clinical signs in dogs and cats with diabetes mellitus.

Directions

View Vetsulin Drug Facts Sheet.

Dosage and Administration

FOR SUBCUTANEOUS INJECTION IN DOGS AND CATS ONLY

Vials: USE OF A SYRINGE OTHER THAN A U-40 SYRINGE WILL RESULT IN INCORRECT DOSING.

Shake the vial thoroughly until a homogeneous, uniformly milky suspension is obtained. Foam on the surface of the suspension formed during shaking should be allowed to disperse before the product is used and, if required, the product should be gently mixed to maintain a homogeneous, uniformly milky suspension before use. Clumps or white particles can form in insulin suspensions: do not use the product if visible clumps or white particles persist after shaking thoroughly.

Cartridges: VETSULIN CARTRIDGES SHOULD BE USED EXCLUSIVELY WITH VETPEN AND 29G/12 MM PEN NEEDLES.

Prior to loading vetsulin cartridges, shake the cartridge until a homogeneous, uniformly milky suspension is obtained. Clumps or white particles can form in insulin suspensions: do not use the product if visible clumps or white particles persist after shaking.

The detailed instructions for use provided with VetPen should be strictly followed.

The injection should be administered subcutaneously, 2 to 5 cm (3/4 to 2 in) from the dorsal midline, varying from behind the scapulae to the mid-lumbar region and alternating sides.

Always provide the Owner Information Sheet with each prescription.

Dogs

The initial recommended vetsulin dose is 0.5 IU insulin/kg body weight. Initially, this dose should be given once daily concurrently with, or right after a meal.

Twice daily therapy should be initiated if the duration of insulin action is determined to be inadequate. If twice daily treatment is initiated, the two doses should each be 25% less than the once daily dose required to attain an acceptable nadir. For example, if a dog receiving 20 units of vetsulin® once daily has an acceptable nadir but inadequate duration of activity, the vetsulin®dose should be changed to 15 units twice daily.

The veterinarian should re-evaluate the dog at appropriate intervals and adjust the dose based on clinical signs, urinalysis results, and glucose curve values until adequate glycemic control has been attained. Further adjustments in dosage may be necessary with changes in the dog's diet, body weight, or concomitant medication, or if the dog develops concurrent infection, inflammation, neoplasia, or an additional endocrine or other medical disorder.

Cats

The initial recommended dose in cats is 1 to 2 IU per injection. The injections should be given twice daily at approximately 12 hour intervals. For cats fed twice daily, the injections should be given concurrently with, or right after each meal. For cats fed ad libitum, no change in feeding schedule is needed

The veterinarian should re-evaluate the cat at appropriate intervals and adjust the dose based on clinical signs, urinalysis results, and glucose curve values until adequate glycemic control has been attained. Further adjustments in dosage may be necessary with changes in the cat's diet, body weight, or concomitant medication, or if the cat develops concurrent infection, inflammation, neoplasia, or an additional endocrine or other medical disorder.

Caution:

Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian.

Contraindications:

Dogs and cats known to have a systemic allergy to pork or pork products should not be treated with vetsulin. vetsulin® is contraindicated during periods of hypoglycemia.

Warnings:

User Safety: For use in animals only. Keep out of the reach of children. Avoid contact with eyes. In case of contact, immediately flush eyes with copious amounts of water for 15 minutes. Accidental injection may cause clinical hypoglycemia. In case of accidental injection, seek medical attention immediately. Exposure to product may induce a local or systemic allergic reaction in sensitized individuals.

Animal Safety: Owners should be advised to observe for signs of hypoglycemia (see Owner Information Sheet). Use of this product, even at established doses, has been associated with hypoglycemia. An animal with signs of hypoglycemia should be treated immediately. Glucose should be given orally or intravenously as dictated by clinical signs. Insulin should be temporarily withheld and, subsequently, the dosage should be adjusted, if indicated. Any change in insulin should be made cautiously and only under a veterinarian's supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, species (animal, human) or method of manufacture (rDNA versus animal-source insulin) may result in the need for a change in dosage.

Appropriate diagnostic tests should be performed to rule out endocrinopathies in pets that are difficult to regulate (e.g., hyperadrenocorticism in dogs and hyperthyroidism in cats).

Precautions:

Animals presenting with severe ketoacidosis, anorexia, lethargy, and/or vomiting should be stabilized with short-acting insulin and appropriate supportive therapy until their condition is stabilized. As with all insulin products, careful patient monitoring for hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia are essential to attain and maintain adequate glycemic control and prevent associated complications. Overdosage can result in profound hypoglycemia and death. Progestogens, certain endocrinopathies, and glucocorticoids can have an antagonistic effect on insulin activity. Intact bitches should be ovariohysterectomized.

Progestogen and glucocorticoid use should be avoided.

Injection Tips

  • If necessary, ask someone to hold your dog prior to injecting Vetsulin (porcine insulin zinc suspension).
  • Location of injection should be altered from behind shoulder blade to slightly in front of hip bone - it depends upon your veterinarian's recommendation and what suits you and your dog.
  • Alternate injection site between left and right side for more comfort.
  • Give your dog her favorite food as you administer the injection.

FAQ

The first insulin approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treating both canine and feline diabetes mellitus. Vetsulin (porcine insulin zinc suspension) is produced by Merck Animal Health and is available only by prescription.
No, Vetsulin is registered in over 30 other countries as Caninsulin. It was first registered in Australia in 1990, so there is a history of more than 25 years of safety and efficacy with this product.
No, Vetsulin is manufactured by Merck Animal Health in Germany.
Vetsulin is an intermediate-acting, lente insulin containing 40 IU per mL of highly purified porcine insulin. As a lente insulin, Vetsulin is an aqueous suspension containing 35% amorphous and 65% crystalline zinc crystals in a neutral buffer of pH 7.35.
No. Vetsulin is a mixture of amorphous (soluble) insulin and crystalline insulin. The crystalline part is relatively insoluble, which is why the insulin activity lasts more than a few hours. Vetsulin has a balance between the amorphous and crystalline parts. If Vetsulin is diluted, the balance between amorphous and crystalline parts is no longer 35% and 65%, relatively speaking. The amount of soluble insulin is increased by the aqueous diluent used. This results in an alteration of the pharmacokinetics of Vetsulin. With a larger aqueous fraction and smaller crystalline fraction, there would be a decrease in the crystalline portion responsible for the second peak of insulin activity.
No, use of a syringe other than a U-40 insulin syringe will result in incorrect dosing. Using a U-100 syringe with Vetsulin would result in an animal receiving 2½ times less insulin than required. Human insulins are formulated at a concentration of 100 IU/mL. If clients use a U-40 insulin syringe with a 100 IU insulin preparation, they would be injecting 2½ times the amount of insulin necessary, which could result in fatal hypoglycemia.
Vetsulin porcine insulin has the same amino acid sequence as natural canine insulin, whereas the commonly prescribed biosynthetic human insulin has a different amino acid sequence. The similar structure may provide more effective regulation of blood glucose and decreases the risk of anti-insulin antibody development in dogs. Unlike the dog, anti-insulin antibodies do not appear to be a problem in cats.

Vetsulin facilitates a more optimal treatment protocol than current human insulin products.

  • Where biosynthetic human insulin is only available in 100 IU/mL concentrations, Vetsulin has a 40 IU/mL concentration allowing for more accurate dosing of small animals and reducing the risk of under- or overdosing.
  • Vetsulin is administered with U-40 insulin syringe or VetPen, making it easier for the client to read and deliver the dose.
  • The duration of activity may be longer.
Caution should be exercised when changing from one insulin product to another. Any change in insulin should be made cautiously and only under a veterinarian’s supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, species (animal, human), or method of manufacture (rDNA versus animal-source insulin) may result in the need for a change in dosage.
Contents of Vetsulin vials and cartridges should be used within 42 days of first puncture.

Reviews

Review Summary
4.0
2 Reviews
5
0% (0)
4
100% (2)
3
0% (0)
2
0% (0)
1
0% (0)
100% Recommend this product (2 of 2 responses)
By Julie
Puyallup, Wa
Vetsulin
December 28, 2018
Was not received overnight and had to be returned and resent. This is the third time this has happened. Must be kept on ice. I repeat this each time I order, yet is two to three days coming and gel pack melted yet the resent ones come overnite fine,each time. Product is fine,delivery is Not. Now I have a couple meds ordered and was advised there is a back order on one yet have not received the other one and no info on when can expect the back order. Products are fine, service is lacking.
By Lorinda T.
Dallas Tx
Good but expensive
February 22, 2018
Good but expensive
ProsWorks to control diabetes in my dog
ConsPrice

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