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Vetoquinol Flexprofen Chewable Tablets for Dogs

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Description

Flexprofen contains carprofen, the most widely used and clinically proven NSAID in veterinary medicine. Carprofen, like other NSAIDs, works by blocking the production of prostaglandins, the compounds that cause inflammation. Most dogs respond quickly to carprofen and become more active and mobile within just a few days of treatment.

Key Benefits

  • True chewable, scored for easy dosing
  • Beef flavored tablet
  • Indicated for relief of pain and inflammation associated with osteoarthritis and postoperative pain in dogs

Dogs with osteoarthritis and dogs recovering from surgery have one thing in common: pain caused by inflammation. Pain and inflammation can stop them from being the healthy, happy dog they truly are. With Flexprofen, you can help your patients become more active and mobile faster. And because Flexprofen comes in delicious chewable tablets that won't crumble, you can rest easy knowing your patients will love getting better.

Pain Relief

Flexprofen contains carprofen, the most widely used and clinically-proven NSAID in veterinary medicine. It helps to reduce inflammation from osteoarthritis, post-operative pain, and other sources of pain.

A True Chew

Flexprofen is a chewable with no crumbling, which makes it easy to administer to all dogs.

Dogs Love It

Thanks to a delicious beef flavor, dogs will love Flexprofen. That means you won’t have to stress about making sure your patients takes their meds!

Prescription Required

Directions

View Flexprofen Drug Facts Sheet.

Always provide Client Information Sheet with prescription. Carefully consider the potential benefits and risk of Flexprofen and other treatment options before deciding to use Flexprofen. Use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration consistent with individual response. The recommended dosage for oral administration to dogs is 2 mg/lb (4.4 mg/kg) of body weight daily. The total daily dose may be administered as 2 mg/lb of body weight once daily or divided and administered as 1 mg/lb (2.2 mg/kg) twice daily. For the control of postoperative pain, administer approximately 2 hours before the procedure. Flexprofen is scored and dosage should be calculated in half-tablet increments. Tablets can be halved by placing the tablet on a hard surface and pressing down on both sides of the score. Carprofen may be fed by hand or placed on food. Care should be taken to ensure that the dog consumes the complete dose.

Caution

Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian.

Contraindications:

Flexprofen should not be used in dogs exhibiting previous hypersensitivity to carprofen.

Warnings:

Keep out of reach of children. Not for human use. Consult a physician in cases of accidental ingestion by humans. For use in dogs only. Do not use in cats.

All dogs should undergo a thorough history and physical examination before initiation of NSAID therapy. Appropriate laboratory tests to establish hematological and serum biochemical baseline data prior to, and periodically during, administration of any NSAID should be considered. Owners should be advised to observe for signs of potential drug toxicity (see Information for Dog Owners, Adverse Reactions, Animal Safety and Post-Approval Experience).

Precautions:

As a class, cyclooxygenase inhibitory NSAIDs may be associated with gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic toxicity. Effects may result from decreased prostaglandin production and inhibition of the enzyme cyclooxygenase which is responsible for the formation of prostaglandins from arachidonic acid.11-14 When NSAIDs inhibit prostaglandins that cause inflammation they may also inhibit those prostaglandins which maintain normal homeostatic function. These anti-prostaglandin effects may result in clinically significant disease in patients with underlying or pre-existing disease more often than in healthy patients.12, 14 NSAID therapy could unmask occult disease which has previously been undiagnosed due to the absence of apparent clinical signs. Patients with underlying renal disease for example, may experience exacerbation or decompensation of their renal disease while on NSAID therapy.11-14 The use of parenteral fluids during surgery should be considered to reduce the potential risk of renal complications when using NSAIDs perioperatively.

Carprofen is an NSAID, and as with others in that class, adverse reactions may occur with its use. The most frequently reported effects have been gastrointestinal signs. Events involving suspected renal, hematologic, neurologic, dermatologic, and hepatic effects have also been reported. Patients at greatest risk for renal toxicity are those that are dehydrated, on concomitant diuretic therapy, or those with renal, cardiovascular, and/or hepatic dysfunction. Concurrent administration of potentially nephrotoxic drugs should be approached cautiously, with appropriate monitoring. Concomitant use of carprofen with other anti-inflammatory drugs, such as other NSAIDs or corticosteroids, should be avoided because of the potential increase of adverse reactions, including gastrointestinal ulcerations and/or perforations. Sensitivity to drug-associated adverse reactions varies with the individual patient. Dogs that have experienced adverse reactions from one NSAID may experience adverse reactions from another NSAID. Carprofen treatment was not associated with renal toxicity or gastrointestinal ulceration in well controlled safety studies of up to ten times the dose in healthy dogs.

Flexprofen is not recommended for use in dogs with bleeding disorders (e.g., Von Willebrand's disease), as safety has not been established in dogs with these disorders. The safe use of carprofen in animals less than 6 weeks of age, pregnant dogs, dogs used for breeding purposes, or in lactating bitches has not been established. Studies to determine the activity of carprofen when administered concomitantly with other protein-bound or similarly metabolized drugs have not been conducted. Drug compatibility should be monitored closely in patients requiring additional therapy. Such drugs commonly used include cardiac, anticonvulsant and behavioral medications. It has been suggested that treatment with carprofen may reduce the level of inhalant anesthetics needed.15

If additional pain medication is warranted after administration of the total daily dose of Flexprofen, alternative analgesia should be considered. The use of another NSAID is not recommended. Consider appropriate washout times when switching from one NSAID to another or when switching from corticosteroid use to NSAID use. Store out of reach of dogs in a secured location. Severe adverse reactions may occur if large quantities of tablets are ingested. If you suspect your dog has consumed Carprofen above the labeled dose, please call your veterinarian for immediate assistance and notify Vetoquinol USA, Inc. 1-800-835-9496.

Information For Dog Owners:

Flexprofen, like other drugs of its class, is not free from adverse reactions. Owners should be advised of the potential for adverse reactions and be informed of the clinical signs associated with drug intolerance. Adverse reactions may include decreased appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, dark or tarry stools, increased water consumption, increased urination, pale gums due to anemia, yellowing of gums, skin or white of the eye due to jaundice, lethargy, incoordination, seizure, or behavioral changes. Serious adverse reactions associated with this drug class can occur without warning and in rare situations result in death (see Adverse Reactions). Owners should be advised to discontinue carprofen therapy and contact their veterinarian immediately if signs of intolerance are observed. The vast majority of patients with drug-related adverse reactions have recovered when the signs are recognized, the drug is withdrawn, and veterinary care, if appropriate, is initiated. Owners should be advised of the importance of periodic follow up for all dogs during administration of any NSAID.

Effectiveness:

Confirmation of the effectiveness of carprofen for the relief of pain and inflammation associated with osteoarthritis, and for the control of postoperative pain associated with soft tissue and orthopedic surgeries, was demonstrated in 5 placebo-controlled, masked studies examining the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effectiveness of carprofen caplets in various breeds of dogs.

Separate placebo-controlled, masked, multicenter field studies confirmed the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effectiveness of carprofen caplets when dosed at 2 mg/lb once daily or when divided and administered at 1 mg/lb twice daily. In these two field studies, dogs diagnosed with osteoarthritis showed statistically significant overall improvement based on lameness evaluations by the veterinarian and owner observations when administered carprofen at labeled doses.

Separate placebo-controlled, masked, multicenter field studies confirmed the effectiveness of carprfen caplets for the control of postoperative pain when dosed at 2 mg/lb once daily in various breeds of dogs. In these studies, dogs presented for ovariohysterectomy, cruciate repair and aural surgeries were administered carprofen preoperatively and for a maximum of 3 days (soft tissue) or 4 days (orthopedic) postoperatively. In general, dogs administered carprofen showed statistically significant improvement in pain scores compared to controls.

Storage:

Store at controlled room temperature 25°C (77°F) with excursions between 15°C - 30°C (59°F - 86°F) permitted.

FAQ

Flexprofen is a non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is used to reduce pain and inflammation (soreness) due to osteoarthritis and pain following surgery in dogs. Flexprofen is a prescription drug for dogs. It is available as a chewable tablet and is given to dogs by mouth.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a painful condition caused by "wear and tear" of cartilage and other parts of the joint that may result in the following changes or signs in your dog:

  • Limping or lameness
  • Decreased activity or exercise (reluctance to stand, climb stairs, jump or run, or difficulty in performing these activities)
  • Stiffness or decreased movement of joints

To control surgical pain (e.g. for surgeries such as spays, ear procedures or orthopedic repairs) your veterinarian may administer Flexprofen before the procedure and recommend that your dog be treated for several days after going home.

While Flexprofen is not a cure for osteoarthritis, it can relieve the pain and inflammation of OA and improve your dog's mobility.

  • Response varies from dog to dog but can be quite dramatic
  • In most dogs, improvement can be seen in a matter of days
  • If Flexprofen is discontinued or not given as directed, your dog's pain and inflammation may come back

Your dog should not be given Flexprofen if he/she:

  • Has had an allergic reaction to carprofen, the active ingredient of Flexprofen.
  • Has had an allergic reaction to aspirin or other NSAIDs such as hives, facial swelling, or red or itchy skin.

Flexprofen chewable tablets should be given to dogs only Cats should not be given Flexprofen. Call your veterinarian immediately if your cat receives Flexprofen. People should not take Flexprofen. Keep Flexprofen and all medicines out of reach of children. Call your physician immediately if you accidentally take Flexprofen.

Flexprofen should be given according to your veterinarian's instructions. Your veterinarian will tell you what amount of Flexprofen is right for your dog and for how long it should be given. Flexprofen should be given by mouth and may be given with or without food.

Talk to your veterinarian about:

  • The signs of OA you have observed (for example limping, stiffness).
  • The importance of weight control and exercise in the management of OA.
  • What tests might be done before Flexprofen is prescribed.
  • How often your dog may need to be examined by your veterinarian.
  • The risks and benefits of using Flexprofen

Tell your veterinarian if your dog has ever had the following medical problems:

  • Experienced side effects from Flexprofen or other NSAIDs, such as aspirin
  • Digestive upset (vomiting and/or diarrhea)
  • Liver disease
  • Kidney disease
  • A bleeding disorder (for example, Von Willbrand's disease)

Tell your veterinarian about:

  • Any other medical problems or allergies that your dog has now or has had.
  • All medicines that your are giving your dog or plan to give your dog, including those you can get without a prescription.

Tell your veterinarian if your dog is:

  • Pregnant, nursing or if you plan to breed your dog.

Flexprofen, like other drugs, may cause some side effects. Serious but rare side effects have been reported in dogs taking NSAIDs, including Flecprofen. Serious side effects can occur with or without warning and in rare situations result in death.

The most common NSAIDs-related side effects generally involve the sotmach (such as bleeding ulcers), and liver or kidney problems. Look for the following side effects that can indicate your dog may be having a problem with Flexprofen or may have another medical problem.

  • Decrease or increase in appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Change in bowel movements (such as diarrhea, or black, tarry or bloody stools)
  • Change in behavior (such as decreased or increased activity level, in coordination, seizure or aggression)
  • Yellowing of gums, skin, or whites of the eyes (jaundice)
  • Change in drinking habits (frequency, amount consumed)
  • Change in urination habits (frequency, color, or smell)
  • Change in skin (redness, scabs, or scratching)

It is important to stop therapy and contact your veterinarian immediately if you think your dog has a medical problem or side effect from Flexprofen therapy. If you have additional question about possible side effects, talk to your veterinarian.

Flexprofen should not be given with other NSAIDs.

Tell your veterinarian about all medicines you have given your dog in the past, and any medicines that you are planning to give with Flexprofen. This should include other medicines that you can get without a prescription. Your veterinarian may want to check that all of our dog's medicines can be given together.

Contact your veterinarian immediately if your dog eats more than the prescribed amount of Flexprofen.

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